Animal Sacrifice on the Rise in Islip, New York

strangetrek-cow-tongue-ritual

The “Silence Ritual”

Authorities are investigating what is believed to be the fourth animal sacrifice on Long Island in the past month. A cow tongue, wrapped in fabric, was found nailed to a tree in East Islip Park on the morning of July 23rd. It is the second such tongue found in the area in July – about a week earlier, a cow tongue was found affixed to a tree on Wilson Blvd. in Central Islip. The tree was in a wooded area surrounded by residential properties. Also, the bodies of three goats were found in June of this year.

Animal sacrifice is rampant in New York’s parks, though parks in and close to New York City see the most activity. A 2009 article from the NY Post reported on the prevalence of black magic rituals in Forest Park and Highland Park, which may be the two biggest hotspots for ritual sacrifice in the state. This summer’s animal sacrifices in the suburbs of East Islip aren’t the area’s first instances of ritual sacrifice, however. The article states that in 2001, six people were arrested for trespassing and beheading a pig at an East Islip marina.

The Post article states that in 2006 a dog bit into a pin-stuffed cow tongue in Central Park.  A little searching reveals that the ritual involving the severed cow-tongue is a rather common black magic spell of silence, often used to invoke the spirits to dissuade a witness from testifying in court. Variations on this spell are thought to exist in voodoo, Santeria, Palo and other religions.

The Many Tongues of Prospect Park

The Gothamist, a great New York City blog, reported on a cow tongue, stuffed with needles, attached to a tree in Prospect Park in March of this year. The story even features a few gruesome pics of the evil tongue. Prospect Park was also the location of what may be the greatest cow tongue find of all time, when in 2009, fifteen cow tongues were found nailed to trees in the park’s Peninsula Meadow. You can file this under “evil poser”, though, as the tongues were thought to come from a butcher shop.